vagfaxI believe in safe sex, but I don’t have to have it in the erotica or romances I read or in the erotica or romances I write. You see, when I write fiction—in my fictional world—I am God(dess).

I’m not saying this to alienate anyone, but come on. I think a lot of the problems we see in society today is because people can’t separate fact from fiction. Take Hollywood or soap operas for an example. How many characters come back from the dead because people (fans) can’t accept that death is a part of life? You know what I’m talking about…(“Oh, it was just a dream!”)

To me, it’s mostly about context.  If I want my characters having protected or unprotected sex, they will if I feel that is within their character and/or the situation, or I’m trying to set up something for a future plot twist. But unless I’m trying to convey a particular message about an issue with my writing, take it for what it’s worth: a good, entertaining read…at least I hope the reader thinks that.

I’m not going to worry about “promoting” unsafe sex because:

  • This is fiction (i. e. “not real”).
  • You should be responsible for your own actions and not lay blame on some fictional character you read in a book or story.
  • I have my own moral compass and do not look at any particular industry as being responsible for it.

To my knowledge, no one has ever gotten pregnant or contracted a STD from reading erotica. They may get it from replicating what they’ve read about, but from simply reading it? No. Now, with regard to the romance genre, the readers, writers, and publishers tend to expect safe sex.

I’ve always been a bit too practical to think that my life would ever resemble any fictional situation I read in a book. Unfortunately, there are women who measure their life, their men, and their relationships against what they read in books or see on TV.

lawyer-dog-sexual-relationsLet’s look at shape-shifter erotica. Some people regard it as a means to normalize bestiality. I wouldn’t go that far. Why? Because in the real world—not the fictional world where these stories take place—there are no shape-shifting werewolves, big cats, tentacle aliens, whatever.

Sorry. Didn’t mean to burst your bubble.

Nevertheless, some writers and publishers of these stories insist that in order to separate themselves from the bestiality taboo, both characters have to have sex in the same form: human/human, shifter/shifter, etc. I think it’s one of the conventions (requirements) of the genre.

To me, I’m not bothered because I know it’s not real regardless of who mounts whom in what form. And I’m hardly going to try and recreate anything vaguely like it. Besides, do you think a werewolf is going to worry about slipping on a condom when he’s trying to slip it to his bitch? Where would he find one big enough? Talk about your slip knots…

But like with the shape-shifter situation, there are publishers that require that stories with graphic sex to show that it’s safe sex, and there are readers who expect the characters to practice safe sex.

If you are a reader who won’t read stories with sex unless the characters practice safe sex, then please continue to do so. I can’t demand these readers to like stories with unsafe sex.

But with that being said, don’t demand that fictional characters in erotic stories have safe sex as if the author is responsible for your (sexual) well being, or that of your child—who shouldn’t be this stuff in the first place.

So, what about you, dear reader? Do you want/expect/demand the characters in the erotica and/or romance stories you read to practice safe sex?

how-to-grow-a-condom

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