good pussyThe female reproductive organ (aka the vagina) has a lot of nicknames. Perhaps the most popular of these alternate names are “cunt”, “pussy”, and “twat.” Readers and writers of erotica and erotic romance tend to have their favorites with regard to the human vagina.

This is my apology for all the cunts, pussies, and twats found in erotica.

Here’s my take on things, and it has to do with erotica versus erotic romance. That is a topic deserving of a separate blog post, but today, I’m just talking about the vagina.

With the latter, erotic romance, I don’t care what anyone says, you are bound to those romantic sensibilities where men have hardened shafts of desire and women have dewy honeypots of love. OK, perhaps not quite so purple, but there is a certain expectation in erotic romance that the language be softer—dare I say genteel? You may encounter a  “pussy” for a vagina, but don’t expect a cunt or twat. With erotica, you can be more blunt, almost brutal in your word choices without apology.

After living abroad for a number of years and hearing the words “cunt” and “twat” used almost as often as “shit” and “fuck,” it doesn’t bother me–anymore. Yes, at first my virgin ears protested, but after time, they adjusted and the shock wore off.

To be honest, I’ve only recently become comfortable referring to the vagina as a “pussy” after a lifetime of being turned off by the word. So, what changed in me and/or my life to make me accept the word “pussy” as a synonym for the vagina?

The word suits my writing. I’m not trying to write “genteel.” I recently had the misfortune to read a story of an author’s historical erotic fiction that referred to the vagina as a “honeyed quim.”

pussymemeThe OED has traced the word “pussy” with regard to cats to languages other than English, and over time, it has devolved into the term some have come to love to hate.

According to Merriam-Webster, the word “cunt” has been in use since the fourteenth century and the word “twat” has been around since the seventeenth century. The term  “honeyed quim” and the like is associated with Victorian erotica. I ask you—are we better off?

I am not against referring to the vagina and all its parts by their medical terms, but sometimes those words can be just as off putting as the more “vulgar” terms “cunt” and “twat.” The proper terms can be as erotic as reading Grey’s Anatomy.

To me, the word “cunt” is a good word to use on occasion to spice things up or as a pejorative. The word “twat” just makes me laugh, so while I wouldn’t use it in an erotic scene, it’s fair game for humor and/or insults.

If I’m reading (or writing) an erotic story and the characters are having at each other and talking dirty, I would not be put off by the occasional “cunt” or “twat” making an appearance. Nor would I cry bloody murder if those words are used in other ways in the story. As far as I’m concerned, it’s a matter of context and characterization. Writers have to be really careful when trying to write metaphors or vaginas can become dripping wet tunnels of love.

Some readers have been known to stop reading in disgust if the term they dislike appears in their selected story and they regard it as making them feel soiled and dirty. That’s a bit drastic in my opinion because writers often use certain words for a reason.

Here’s a question: if a woman’s mons pubis is shaved…can it still be called a pussy?

I don’t see how. Pussies (i. e. cats) are furry—that is to say covered in hair—so what do you call a hairless one? A skinned pussy? This raises another question.

Do the terms pussy/cunt/twat refer to just the outside or the inside—or the whole shebang, so to speak?

To those people who cannot abide by the C-word, the T-word, or even the P-word that, in my mind, leaves few options: the correct medical term, creative but sometimes-clumsy metaphors—or pulpy purple prose.

So call it a cunt, pussy, or twat if the word fits…as long as you don’t call it a va-jay-jay.

twat cunt hear

 

 

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